A Travellerspoint blog

bangkok is growing on me

and final thoughts on myanmar

i was quite overwhelmed by bangkok upon my arrival. but to be honest, after our travails in myanmar, coming back to bangkok (civilization, good food options, not so much dirt and dust, and cars more recent than 1984 that don't expel black fumes, more opportunities for a/c) seemed like a blessing. not that i didn't enjoy myanmar. it was an amazing experience. i saw so many things that just were, well, surreal. sitting next to a monk in an internet cafe was one. the street flooding and people just walking through shin deep filthy water on the sidewalk, people carrying baskets and big! bags on their heads, fake 7-elevens since the real ones aren't allowed, squat toilets. many of the people were friendly. some were not especially, but perhaps just a language and cultural barrier.

as i mentioned the fake 7-11 - there aren't any chain restaurants or stores at all. there are some myanmar versions, like j'donuts (kinda like dunkin donuts) and parisian cake cafe. but the fake 7-11 in bagan even had a photocopied (and pixelated) banner with the store's logo. but the inside was definitely not a 7-11...

no one ever mentioned anything political, obviously and never did we. but on our taxi ride back to the airport i noticed more than i had before the military men standing on streets corners, outside fancy residences, near the park, near the lake holding their huge guns. and then there were stickers on people's cars or taxis of guns with a big red "x" over them. i'm not here to make any statements either way, but definitely something that strikes an emotional chord.

but yes. back to bangkok we are. we are in a lovely hotel with a pool, a/c, shuttle service to things in town, fast internets:), and a volume control in the bathroom! the first night we just enjoyed the hotel and some nearby food and a trip to a real 7-11 to stock up on goodies. 7-11's here are like starbucks back home - they are on every street corner. yesterday, after an attempt at a nearby internet cafe (the power went out twice, hence i was only able to upload a few photos, whilst sitting next to a 10 yr old girl playing grand theft auto), we headed to mbk which is a big mall. sounds lame i know. but this mall is biiiig. like 6 or more floors. plus i was able to get a sim card for my phone so i have a new thai phone number temporarily. mostly i got it for internet service for when i'm traveling. but if you feel so inclined, the number is +66 0845675028. we then went to another mall nearby called siam center. this was the fancy mall, also like 7 floors. they have an swanky imax theater with a chandelier and aquariums around the food court. we met up with friends of flo's at a restaurant in the ritzy part of bangkok, thonglo. we all headed to a lounge nearby to meet up with some more of their friends. the lounge looked kind of like a modern castle with blue velvet couches ha. and then we headed to some dude's very luxurious penthouse suite for an after-after party. don't worry, it wasn't anything crazy. just some people hanging around chatting and relaxing. the crowd was mostly asians, surprise surprise. several of them were from bangkok, but were not of thai descent. it was a moment that felt like it was from a movie, sitting in this marble-floored, gold trimmed, grand stiaircase apartment overlooking bangkok city lights.

today, we are meeting up with another of flo's friends who runs a bakery out of one of the sister hotels of the one we're staying at. the company is amari. ours is amari atrium in case you're curious. we're goign to sample some delicious cakes, then head to a well-known weekend market, called chatuchak market for some shopping! tonight i'm not sure - either dinner with friends, or muy thai boxing...tbd. but i'm really getting used to this asia place. at least bangkok doesn't seem so overhwhelming now, and i actually am kinda liking it as i discover its many sides.

tomorrow, sadly flo will be leaving:( but then my journey continues with my group tour!

Posted by shlee 19:49 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

Bangkok (new and improved with photos!)

an...interesting city...

i woke up bright and early on sat. morning in bangkok. my hostel, called suk 11, was a funky little jungle-y retreat in this crazy metropolis of a city. the hostel was tucked in a little corner side street off a main bustling road full of street vendors, cab drivers, a thousand massage parlors (not all the were you know that kind, i don't think). the entire front of the building was covered by plants. so you walk through into this really unique environment that is like being in a treehouse.

entrance to suk 11

entrance to suk 11

there's lots of wood. there was a tall kitchen table with stools, and a few other tables too where guests and staff could eat breakfast or lunch or just hang out.

main lobby, kitchen table

main lobby, kitchen table

then as you traveled up the stairs and onto each guest room floor, there were hallways with wooden planks that were placed with rocks beside them, so even though you were inside, you felt like it was outdoors.

hallway

hallway

then along the hallways, there was exposed brick and cool lanterns that made it feel very rustic and vintage. there were sitting rooms, some with floor cushions along the hallways too. there were buddha shrines and collections of books left by previous hostellers. tons of little detailed accents and decorations along the way too that made it just so intriguing to walk through. each time you'd find something new and different.

another hallway

another hallway


hang out area

hang out area

i set off early for some sightseeing. i took the skytrain to the river and then got on a hop on/off boat up the river. that way i was able to stop off at a couple different piers and get to the main tourist sites: i.e. the grand palace, wat pho, wat arun and then eventually the vinmanmek teak mansion. so that is basically the order i went in. first stop was the grand palace. it was a large compound of different styles of pagodas and shrines and buildings. lots of cool statues and shiny gold roofs. i got a delicious lunch in the market by the pier which was fried rice with basil and chicken. it was actually pretty delicious and only 40 baht (just a little over a dollar!)
grand palace

grand palace


i asked this woman to take my picture. she stood in front of this stupa and posed for me. a nice souvenir i suppose.

i asked this woman to take my picture. she stood in front of this stupa and posed for me. a nice souvenir i suppose.


oh so artsy

oh so artsy


people dipping lotus flowers in holy water, then dropping it on their heads outside temple

people dipping lotus flowers in holy water, then dropping it on their heads outside temple


holy stuff - lotus, incense, eggs (?) outside temple

holy stuff - lotus, incense, eggs (?) outside temple

me outside temle with the emerald buddha inside (couldn't take pics inside temple)

me outside temle with the emerald buddha inside (couldn't take pics inside temple)


paintings around grand palace

paintings around grand palace


phew glad i opted to leave my roller skates at home this trip!

phew glad i opted to leave my roller skates at home this trip!


mmm fried rice with basil and chicken mmm<img class='img' src='http://www.travellerspoint.com/Emoticons/icon_smile.gif' width='15' height='15' alt=':)' title='' />

mmm fried rice with basil and chicken mmm:)

next i walked over to wat pho, a temple just near the grand palace. here is where one of the famous reclining buddhas resides. as well as a pretty well known massage school center where you can get pretty cheap massages. unfortunately, i was 5 baht short of being able to get one:( there were these bins along the side of the temple inside, where people dropped coins one by one in. i think it's for the monks? not sure, but it looked cool.

reclining buddha at wat pho

reclining buddha at wat pho


bins for dropping coins in

bins for dropping coins in


these skinny little kitties are all over town. also dogs, which lie around on the streets looking half dead. so sad<img class='img' src='http://www.travellerspoint.com/Emoticons/icon_sad.gif' width='15' height='15' alt=':(' title='' />

these skinny little kitties are all over town. also dogs, which lie around on the streets looking half dead. so sad:(

i had to take another ferry (that cost 3 baht, which might be like a penny or less) across the river to wat arun. this temple was different because it was really tall and you were able to climb up it. the stairs were crazy steep, but there only about 39 of them so it wasn't too bad.

wat arun

wat arun


climbing the steep steps of wat arun

climbing the steep steps of wat arun

after this venture, i realized i was out of baht and in need of an atm. i walked inland towards the "town" and asked around. one guy told me it was across the river...not helpful. then a tuk tuk driver told me he would drive me there and bring me back for 60 baht because it was a km away in both directions. i had a hard time believing it could be that far. so i continued walking and asking around. finally, 20 odd minutes later after walking by some schools and townspeople (the real bangkok) i found one. i got my cash, and decided to take a tuk tuk (which is a mini taxi - kinda like a motorcyle/car with covered seats in the back that fits around 2-3 people, though i saw ones carrying 6-7 people at times) back to the ferry (for 40 baht). to make this journey even more adventurous, i tried to pay the tuk tuk driver but he didn't have enough change for the huge bills they gave me out of the atm machine. so then i had to ask some nearby thai's for some change. several of them jumped in to help me out and were super nice about it:) that taken care of, i paid my 3 baht and headed back over the river. i got back on the up river ferry and took it pretty far to where a guard had told me to get off for the teak mansion. once again, i misjudged how far it was on the map, and once i got off i decided to walk. well, actually i considered a tuk tuk, but the driver told me that mansion was closed (a lie) and tried to convince me to let him take me to this other palace instead cause it was nicer (a scam). so walked i did. and after walking a good 30 minutes, and sweating off a few pounds probably, i made it to the mansion. i thought i was just barely in time for last tour. they let me in, and sat me down to wait 15 mins for the next english speaking tour. at this point, sadly enough, i realized i had been thinking it was an hour later all day. turns out when i came from hong kong to bangkok, the time difference turned an hour earlier...so really it was earlier than i thought!

after the tour, which was alright i suppose, i continued near the grounds to another building so and so's "throne hall" for an exhibit on the arts of thailand. i only went cause the admission was included in the ticket i paid for the mansion (which was included with the grand palace entry fee). but in order to enter, they required me to purchase a 40 baht sarong to wear inside (they are picky about what you wear inside temples and certain places. you have to dress modestly. in fact, i almost didn't make it into the grand palace with my capris). the art exhibit was amazing actually! i think it was the queen or a princess who commissioned native artisans to come together and create some works of art to show off the skills of their country for preservation. my favorites were a chandelier made of crystal and beetle wings (the shiny green ones) and some hand embroidered paintings that were so detailed it was baffling.

i tuk tuk'd my way back to the skytrain and back to the hostel for a rest.

tuk tuk

tuk tuk

my friend flo met up with me a couple hours later, and we grabbed a nice thai dinner at our hostel, sitting on cool thai floor cushions. we then just walked around and explored our area. it wasn't too impressive. in fact it's a weird mix of big swanky hotels frequented by males from europe or the u.s. we saw several odd couples walking around of these men with pretty, young thai girls. at night, the workers from all these hundreds of massage parlors come out and solicit business on the streets. they really go after the men, grabbing their arms and begging them to come in. i also saw 2 ladyboys, one was also soliciting for a massage parlor.

bangkok is HUGE. i had no idea how large it would be. it's really spread out. and unlike most u.s. cities, the "downtown" part is not condensed into one area. there are big skyscrapers everywhere. and lots of traffic. lots of street vendors. lots of sketchy stores and situations going on...but luckily our hostel was in a nice little backpacker (mostly westerners) pocket.

ok, gotta run for now. in myanmar now, lots more to update!

Posted by shlee 22:03 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

broken roads and close encounters of the cockroach kind

welcome to bagan, myanmar

the bus ride to bagan from yangon was going rather smoothly..at first. we stopped a couple times at rest stops, kinda like the myanmar version of the chesapeake or maryland house on 95 on the way to nyc from dc. they sold food (mostly fried noodles and things) and i encountered my first squat toilet experience. the concept isn't so bad i guess, since i'm wary to sit on a public toilet seat anyway. but these toilet stalls were, well, disgusting. i'm extremely glad i brought a packet of t.p. and hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes to say the least.

so after buying some prepackaged snacks (the regular food considering the conditions of the bus station just weren't appetizing) and the amusement of some local girls as i kept dropping said snacks as i tried to eat them with chopsticks, we were back on our way into the night. we had left yangon around 6 pm and were scheduled to arrive in bagan around 4 or 5 or even 6 am (a loose schedule obviously). around 3 am the bus came to a halt. i wasn't sure why. it was pitch black outside. and no one on the bus seemed to mind. i heard lots of tinkering with the engine, trying to start it and failing. i was pretty sure the bus had just broken down. so we sat and waited. an hour went by. finally, the bus too hot, i stepped outside to see what was going on as dawn was breaking. i saw a row of like 10 buses ahead of us. everyone was just stopped. so flo and i walked down the road further to see why. apparently the rains had made the next part of the highway impassable. the road was paved up until that point and after that point. so i'm not sure why this one small section of road was left as sand and dirt. it seemed some people were able to get on smaller trucks and be driven across. finally we found a non-native looking person who spoke english and said we could just walk across and get a ride on the other side. cause our buses didn't seem to be in any hurry to go anywhere, and I'm not sure what exactly they were waiting for anyway (the road to dry??).

so we grabbed our luggage, lugged it across all the dirt and sand and then asked around for a taxi or a bus on the other side. some guy in a pick up truck offered us a ride, along with a burmese woman carrying two huge baskets of mangoes. so the 3 of us in the back of this truck took off for bagan at dawn. it was really surreal. there were men sleeping on top of wooden basket type crates with squealing pigs in them. there were chickens and roosters crowing. wild dogs all around. farmers plowing fields with oxen. our bus drivers were sleeping on straw mats in the road. the scenery seemed lovely - a bit jungle, a bit desert.

bagan was only a few kilometers drive down the road. the man dropped us off right at our guesthouse. we checked in, took showers and enjoyed a little rest in some a/c. ahhhh. we arranged everything we needed with the reception staff - a horse drawn cart tour of bagan for the day to see all the temples/pagodas, which there are many in bagan. that is the main draw here in fact. it's much more rural than yangon, which is a big (albeit 3rd world) city. in bagan, there are some trucks and buses, but most people get around on motorized scooters and bikes. everyone just honks before they pass you, but otherwise there aren't many traffic rules it seems.

the day on the horse cart was long and hot. it was over 100 degrees i think here. we hadn't slept much from our bus fiasco, so we were a bit cranky and tired. the pagodas are all really old (11th and 12th century) and in bad disrepair or they've been reconstructed. after awhile though, sadly, they all just start looking the same. after 5 hours on our cart tour, we were like "another temple?" the insides all have buddha statues. most of them painted gold or with red clothes and black hair. there are burmese people that just wait at the pagodas and try to sell you stuff when tourists come. the locals don't really care about the pagodas at all, except for the fact that it brings money from tourists. i can see now how very poor the country is, especially out in the more rural parts. many of the people have been friendly, aside from some of the pushy sales people. and many are eager to practice english speaking with you.

the food in myanmar has been ok, nothing spectacular. there were more options in bagan actually - like curry dishes with rice and pancakes (more like a crepe) and lots of fruit! we even got a lassi drink at one place. you will see many burmese people with yellow paste stuff on their cheeks and faces - it's a paste made from trees around here that they use as sunscreen. we even got to try some on our second day in bagan. they scrape the wood on a metal surface and mix in some water to make the paste and then just rub it on. i could probably use some on my whole body since i'm so pale.

the first night in our hostel, after a nice long relaxing dinner, we discovered a new friend in our bathroom - a cockroach! flo was the man and killed him for me as i screamed like a little girl. but then, early wed. morning i woke up to use the bathroom, did a quick cockroach check and started to proceed. as i entered though, one dashed out from the drain. i squealed but went after it with my shoe. i was unsuccessful a couple times and he made his way out into the bedroom (gross!) fearing it getting into my luggage, i went after it like my life depended on it and huzzah! (it's making me cringe just writing about it now though...)

on wed. we rented 2 beach cruiser type bikes with baskets from our guesthouse. we rode them into the part of town called "old bagan" where there are temples (shocker) and some yummy cafes (namely the one that sells lassi's and some delicious tamarind candy). we relaxed, bought some souvenirs, and then made our way back on the bikes. sadly flo's sneakers were falling apart. we tried to salvage it by rubberbanding the sole to keep it on, but to no avail. the journey back was still HOT, but things like herds of goats and cattle being driven across the pagoda plains as you cycle by are pretty unforgettable.

we got on the bus back to yangon yesterday at 5 pm. this bus seemed like a joke. it seems that myanmar gets the reject and old ghetto buses from other countries, and this was one of them. i believe it was a chinese bus probably from circa 1970's. it felt like it was about to fall apart with every bump in the road. it rattled. it shook. it jolted. there were noooo seatbelts. i felt like i was on that coney island roller coaster where it so rickety and old, and the lap bar is way to far away to actually do any good and you feel like you're going to fly out on every curve. i felt my stomach drop a couple times as we went over hills. needless to say, i slept about nil on this ride. luckily we made it to yangon around 4 am. we shared a taxi with a lady monk, and after dropping her off at her monastery, we got dropped off at a hotel in town. we just chilled in the lobby for a couple hours napping. they wouldn't let us leave our bags with the bell captain because "myanmar is a sensitive country" and they need to make sure we're not carrying bombs or something like that. so we trekked with our bags to an indian restaurant (for breakfast) and then left them at the guesthouse we originally stayed at on our first day here. we're heading to the airport shortly to fly back to bangkok. luckily we have a reallly nice hotel booked there. i'm looking forward to a nice long shower, a/c and a nice comfy bed. and i think there's even a pool!

Posted by shlee 23:28 Archived in Myanmar Comments (1)

a dash of myanmar

quite the dash too

our flight to myanmar was quick - only 40 minutes or maybe an hour. oddly enough, myanmar is in its own timezone that is one half-hour behind thailand. we arrived at the airport, which was more modern than i was expecting, but yet still very small and not really that modern. it did have automatic flushing toilets and hand dryers though. went through security with flying colors. and once in the area to find transportation we found it incredibly easy to find a taxi to town. we had no real plan. i mean we had the names of a couple potential guesthouses in town. and we knew you could pay with u.s. dollars for things. a man helped us get a taxi right away for $8 us. not sure if that's a good price or not, but it seemed fair since it's a pretty good distance away.

we had the taxi driver take us to one of the guesthouses we'd read about. we got a room there for the two of us for $14 us. no a/c, only a fan. but it came with a nice mosquito net! the guesthouse directed us to a hotel where we could change our money. the exchange rate in myanmar is an interesting phenomenon. if you go to a currency exchange website and type in 18 myanmar kyats (bus fare) equals how many dollars, it'll say something outrageous like it's equal to $2000 us. apparently, that rate is not the rate they actually use. but for some reason they don't every change it. so when you change money here, it's on a "black market" rate. everywhere you go, people off you slightly different rates. the one we got last night at the traders hotel was less than what some others had quoted us. but rather than changing money with some random dude on the street, we decided it was the better option. they are also very particular about the condition of the bills you bring. they give better exchange rates for bigger bills like $100 or $50 bills. i had to make sure i got the crispest, cleanest, most perfect $100 bills before i came. i heard horror stories of people in myanmar refusing us dollars from people because they weren't perfect enough. the myanmar kyats are usually in the thousands. so 1,000 kyats is like a little over a dollar. but you use the 1,000 kyat bills like you would dollar bills. so when changing money, we got a fat rapstar-size wad of cash to carry around. cool i guess?

last night while admiring some interesting street food set ups and trying to determine what we could eat for dinner, we were approached by a monk with very limited english and brown teeth. he was very nice. then his pupil, a young man dressed in western clothes also came up and they asked us where we were from. the pupil spoke good english so they helped us find some curry at a street food vendor and helped us translate with the vendors. the food was not very spicy and sort of a blend of other asian types of food. then there is a pot of tea at every table, which i think he said was green tea. the tables you sit at at all these street vendor cafes are actually little kid size plastic tables, not unlike the one my brother and i had when we were little.

after dinner, they walked us back toward our guesthouse, and then before departing they asked if we would like to make a donation to help the children at the orphanage where they work. we gave them a 1,000 kyat note. figured they were very helpful to us in finding food, so even if their intentions were for a handout, it wasn't a lot they were asking for. earlier we were approached by a girl selling postcards who was literally begging me for money. she was tugging at my arms and saying things like her family have nothing and are hungry. at first i tried to say no and keep on walking. she left us as we walked through this hotel area. but amazingly persistent as she was, she joined us again after we passed through the hotel area and continued her quest. so finally i gave her a 1,000 kyat note as well cause she would NOT give up. it does make me sad to see a lot of people living very poorly indeed, and even a small handout like that is a big deal for them. however, i'm not a human atm. so i can't keep giving handouts to everyone, ya know?

many of the burmese people wear this yellow paste stuff on their cheeks. we were told it was from some tea leaves i think and that was like sun protection. the women and the men mostly wear sarongs and sandals. some people wear jeans or other western style clothes, but sarongs are definitely predominant.

there is one cinema in yangon. and of all the movies that could be playing, the only 2 that are being shown involve nicholas cage - drive angry and season of the witch. i feel very sorry for the people of yangon...

after a rough night listening to rain falling on tin roofs, a mattress that was mushy, and a steamy room with only a fan we had some breakfast at our hostel. breakfast consisted of noodles with veggies, mango, tea, and instant coffee. noodles for breakfast i'm finding is a common trend in these parts, and really it's not that bad - you can eat breakfast for dinner, so why not dinner for breakfast?

on the way to the bus station to buy bus tickets, we were approached by another two men who spoke english. they were very friendly and walked us to the place where you buy bus tickets (which was good cause all the writing was in burmese and our directions there weren't very good). we got our bus tickets for tonight to bagan. originally we were planning to fly there, but there are only 2 flights a day and there were already booked. we figured we could stay another night in that ucomfortable hostel and fly out early tomorrrow morning. or we could pay for an overnight air conditioned bus with reclining seats - can't be any worse and there's a/c! plus we are saving a lot of money by not flying. we'll have just 2 days in bagan, but that should be enough to see some of the (thousands of) temples.

next we took a taxi to the shwe dagon pagoda, the biggest buddhist pagoda here. it's huge and similar to ones i saw in bangkok, with big golden temples and big white promenades with little pagodas and buddhist shrines all over. we had to take our shoes off for the entire area, which was guh-ross cause the floor was nasty and there were pathetic and sick looking dogs (like there are all over myanmar) laying on the floor. there was poop on the floor in one part. bleh. when we were finally done, we wiped our feet clean with some moist towlettes. around the pagoda, a burmese woman was trying to discretely take my picture as her family was walking by me. i asked if they wanted a photo. so i posed in a photo with them. i'm like a celebrity.

so far burmese people have been extremely friendly and helpful and seem to really enjoy talking to and seeing westerners. i have felt very welcome and i don't feel like i'm being cheated for everything like in bangkok. i mean it's possible i'm still being overcharged or cheated somewhat, but as least they do it nicely!

Posted by shlee 00:34 Archived in Myanmar Comments (2)

a dollop more of bankgok

on sunday morning, flo and i woke up pretty late, like almost 10 am. breakfast was only til 10 so we dashed down. i saw a guy wearing a nats hat. turns out he used to live in rosslyn and then moved to michigan for grad school which is where he met his friend he was with. small world!

anyway, i had an unfruitful search for a sim card for my aunt's old iphone - i just want to find one i can put in it for wi fi and maybe even to send texts and such. but we'll have to make a trip to the big mall in bkk (bangkok) to get one. so i'll try to do that when i get back to bkk.

we decided not to stray too far from our hostel and our luggage since we had to be at the airport around 2 pm. so tradtional thai massages it was! there are llllllooottts of thai massage parlors. some have names like happy massage or friends massage. we found one that looked more traditional and clean and nice. for 300 baht (around $10) we got nice hour long massages. i had a thai herbal massage back in the states by a thai girl, and that was really wonderful and relaxing. but this one was intense. traditional thai massages involved not just hands on massage, but they take your legs and arms and contort your body around to stretch you out. at times, the girl was putting her full body weight on me, standing on my butt as she pulled my arms back behind me to stretch my back. i'm not sure if it was just my massage lady or what, but there were times were i passed my pain threshold. she dug her arms and elbows into muscles and crevices of my body that i didn't even know i had. i thought things that were on my insides were going to come outside. once she was pushing on my arms and i felt something on the opposite side of my arm move. probably just a bone of something. you know, no big deal...my friend said her massage wasn't painful so maybe it was just me. i have to say though, that afterwards, i def felt limber and rested. it still wasn't as painful as the cheap chinese massage i got in chinatown, n.y.c. once where the woman dug her elbow points into my shoulders - i was sore for days after.

thai massage

thai massage

we grabbed some street food - i got some soup "to go" which meant pouring the hot broth into a plastic bag and the noodles and other ingredients into another plastic bag, both tied off with a rubber band. we took it back to our hostel and ate there. i'm not even sure what i ordered. i basically just asked for noodle soup. inside was an assortment of creatures - i believe we identified some liver (not sure from what animal) and some chicken maybe (with the bumps on the outside of the skin), some fish balls (like a meatball) and some beef (?). i pretty much just ate the noodles and bean sprouts. though i did try the fish balls and they were pretty tasty.

bag o' soup

bag o' soup

shortly thereafter, we had to catch a taxi to the airport. the first taxi driver said it would be 300 baht. we scoffed, since we had read it should only be 250 baht. so we went with this other (pink) taxi with a meter. then he took us on the toll road (which is better cause there's not as much traffic) but costs an extra 70 baht for the toll fee. so the grand total ended up being like 295 baht. so really, we didn't win that round. but we made good time, and had lots of time to kill at the airport. everything there was expensive though. they even had gucci and lots of other designer stores. we opted for a can of soda and some pad thai instead.

p.s. you can get ninja stars at the street markets in bkk.

i'm seeing stars

i'm seeing stars

Posted by shlee 23:59 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

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